Stalin
Churchill
Roosevelt
The Common Struggle Against Fascism

Yalta Conference of the Big Three. 1945

"I come from the Crimea Conference with a firm belief that we have made a good start on the road to a world of peace.

There were two main purposes in this Crimea Conference. The first was to bring defeat to Germany with the greatest possible speed, and the smallest possible loss of Allied men.

The second purpose was to continue to build the foundation for an international accord that would bring order and security after the chaos of the war, that would give some assurance of lasting peace among the Nations of the world.

The United States will not always have its way a hundred percent – nor will Russia nor Great Britain. We shall not always have ideal answers – solutions to complicated international problems, even though we are determined continuously to strive toward that ideal. But I am sure that under the agreements reached at Yalta, there will be a more stable political Europe than ever before."

Message to Congress regarding the Yalta Conference, 1 March 1945. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum. Identifier: 122205273.

 
12 April 1945
Russian State Archive of Social and Political History

Russian translation.

English original. Hand­signed by А. Harriman

 

"There is a relationship, in an American democracy, between their President and the people... We who are sovereign, we who are American citizens, must help if any President is to be a great President. If Franklin Roosevelt was a great President, it was – in the main – thanks to the articulated intelligence of the American people during his terms in the White House."

Elliott Roosevelt, As He Saw It, p. 259.

 
Before 1949
State Historical Museum

Tinted plaster.

52 х 28 х 18 cm

 

"My wife felt very deeply that our inability to give Russia any military help disturbed and distressed the nation increasingly as the months went by and the German armies surged across the steppes. Mr. Eden and I encouraged her to explore the possibility of obtaining funds by voluntary subscription for medical aid. This had already been begun by the British Red Cross and St John's, and my wife was invited by the Joint Organisation to head the appeal for ‘Aid to Russia'. <...>

For the next four years she devoted herself to this task with enthusiasm and responsibility. In all nearly eight million pounds were collected by the contributions of rich and poor alike."

Winston Churchill, The Second World War, vol. III: “The Grand Alliance”, pp. 421–422.

 
USSR. 1943
State Historical Museum

Silver, enamel; stamped, mounted, soldered, hot-enamelled.

51 х 38 mm; height with ribbon 100 mm.